Stocks come off highs but optimism reigns, OPEC agrees cut

Morning Note

German and Chinese data is taking the gloss a little off Friday’s US jobs report, but the overriding sense in stock markets remains one of remarkable optimism. Speaking of which, pubs in England could reopen by Jun 22nd.

Stock markets surged last week and completed Friday by breaking through more important levels after a very strong jobs report from the US. The nonfarm payrolls report showed the US economy added 2.5m jobs in May, after more than 20m were lost the previous.

This was taken as a reason to buy stocks as it handsomely beat forecasts of 8m jobs being lost. The S&P 500 is now down just 1% for the year and trades with a forward price-to-earnings ratio of more than 23.

The report was of course hailed as a signal of American greatness – the biggest comeback in history, according to Donald Trump – and the White House even suggested it meant less support may be needed for the economy: ‘There’s no reason to have a major spending bill. The sense of urgent crisis is very greatly dissipated by the report,’ said the president’s economic advisor Stephen Moore.

Cue the Federal Reserve this week which needs to keep up the ‘whatever it takes’ mantra – does it see concern in the recent rise in Treasury yields that it needs to lean on, or will it take their recovery as a sign of optimism?

NFP boosts stocks, but recovery will still take a long time

I would like to make three points on this jobs report.

One, an unemployment rate of 13.3% is still very, very bad – 18m jobs lost over two months and a continuing weekly claims count on the rise.

Two, this was the easy bit as furloughed workers came back to their jobs as soon as they could – this seemed to happen a little quicker than had been expected but was, in itself, not the surprise. The tough part is not the immediate snap back in activity once restrictions lift, but recovery to 2019 levels of employment and productivity, which will take much, much longer.

Three, the data itself is flawed. There have been classification errors, so the real rate of unemployment may be much higher, whilst the response rate to the survey was a lot lower than usual.

Treasury yields and stocks surged – the S&P 500 went above 3200 before closing at 3193, whilst 10-year yields drove to 0.94%. Gold pulled back to its weakest level in a month.

China trade data, German industry output weigh on European stock markets

European stock markets opened lower on Monday, pulling back marginally from Friday’s peaks as Chinese trade data and German industrial production numbers weighed. China’s exports fell 3.3% year-on-year in May, whilst imports declined 16.7%.

German industrial plunged 18% last month, the biggest-ever decline.  But there is little sign risk appetite has really slackened. The FTSE 100 looks well supported now above 6400, having closed the all-important March 6th-9th gap. The DAX looks well supported at 12,700.

Crude oil gaps higher after OPEC meeting

Crude prices gapped higher at the open after OPEC+ agreed to extend the deepest level of production cuts by another month and Saudi Arabia followed this by hiking its July official selling prices by around $6, more than had been expected.

A deal among OPEC and allies, confirmed on Saturday, had already been all but announced last week. WTI (Aug) pushed up above $40 but gains have been capped with this agreement being all but fully priced.

The question will be whether there is appetite among members to extend cuts again. Those countries that have not complied with quotas in May and June will need to make up the difference in July, August and September.

Higher oil prices will encourage US shale producers to reopen taps, whilst it is unclear how well demand is coming back despite lockdown restrictions being lifted around the world.

Week Ahead: Expectations high for FOMC meeting

Week Ahead

As has become the norm, we can expect a slew of dire economic data over the coming week. We’ll be looking at the figures for clues on how long the economic recovery could take, and also if projections for the expected Q2 collapse look like they were dire enough. 

The FOMC could bring back its economic projections, and may also provide some additional clarity on the policy outlook with a shift towards implicit forward guidance. 

What can confidence data tell us about the post-Covid recovery? 

Traders, economists, businesses, and policymakers across the globe are still uncertain what shape the post-lockdown recovery will take. Many are still hoping for a sharp rebound, but it seems unlikely. 

Amongst all this uncertainty, business and consumer sentiment is a useful indicator of how people on the ground feel about the road ahead. Unsurprisingly the surveys so far have been deeply pessimistic. 

But economies are reopening, lockdown measures are being eased, and some semblance of normal life is returning for people in many countries. Has this translated into a more positive outlook, or has taking the first step simply highlighted how far we have left to travel on the road to recovery?

US inflation data – is sustained deflation on the way? 

US inflation data is due this week. The headlines recently have been impressive – April saw the biggest drop in price growth since December 2008, and core inflation posted the largest drop since the data series began in 1957. 

A single month of sharp price declines isn’t going to worry policymakers too much, but the big worry is that we’re entering an extended period of deflation. Interest rates are already at rock bottom, but another below-zero reading for price growth could see markets questioning how much longer the FOMC can leave it before pushing rates negative. 

FOMC meeting – markets looking for economic projections and forward guidance 

The Federal Open Market Committee announces its latest policy decisions on Thursday. 

Markets will be hoping for more direction from the FOMC this time around. April’s meeting, and the subsequent minutes, failed to provide any concrete outline of how monetary policy could evolve in the future to respond to worsening economic conditions. Members had discussed establishing targets for unemployment and inflation, and also for setting a threshold date before which rates would not be increased. 

We’re likely to see the Summary of Economic Projections make a return; this was dropped in March, because the outlook for the economy at the time was too uncertain to call. This, and a move towards implicit forward guidance, will give markets a more accurate picture of Fed policy going forwards. 

UK growth and production data to shape Q2 expectations 

A slew of UK data for April gives us a glimpse of the dreaded Q2 performance. It’s accepted that this quarter will be dire, but monthly GDP and industry production figures will show whether even the worst-case scenarios have been gloomy enough. 

The GDP average for the threemonth period ending in April is expected to print at -12%, down from -2% in April. On a monthly basis, growth is forecast down -24%, while the year-on-year drop will be around -29%. Manufacturing production is likely to have fallen almost -30%. We’re in the midst of what is supposed to be the worst of it, but there are still questions over just how badly the economy has been hit. 

Clear skies for Adobe’s cloud-based offering? 

With earnings season over, the corporate calendar is looking decidedly thin, although Adobe could prove an interesting highlight. 

The company’s software is cloud-based, much to the relief of many of the businesses who rely on it but have employees stuck at home away from their work computers. The fact its products are sold on a subscription model could help to keep revenue relatively stable, although like most companies Adobe is likely to report a hit to business during the quarter.

Highlights on XRay this Week 

Read the full schedule of financial market analysis and training.

07.15 UTC Daily European Morning Call
17.00 UTC 08-June Blonde Markets
From 15.30 UTC 09-June Gold, Silver, and Oil Weekly Forecasts
17.00 UTC 10-June FOMC Preview with chief market analyst Neil Wilson
14.45 UTC 11-June Master the Markets with Andrew Barnett

Key Events this Week

Watch out for the biggest events on the economic calendar this week:

06.00 UTC 08-Jun German Industrial Production
08.30 UTC 08-Jun Eurozone Sentix Investor Confidence
01.30 UTC 09-Jun AU NAB Business Confidence
09.00 UTC 09-Jun Eurozone Final Employment Change / Revised GDP (Q/Q)
00.30 UTC 10-Jun Westpac Consumer Sentiment
01.30 UTC 10-Jun China CPI
12.30 UTC 10-Jun US CPI
14.30 UTC 10-Jun US EIA Crude Oil Inventories
18.00 UTC 10-Jun FOMC Rate Decision
18.30 UTC 10-Jun FOMC Press Conference
Pre-Market 10-Jun Dollarama – Q1 2021
12.30 UTC 11-Jun US Unemployment Claims
14.30 UTC 11-Jun US EIA Natural Gas Storage
After-Market 11-Jun Adobe – Q2 2020
06.00 UTC 12-Jun UK GDP (M/M), Manufacturing/Industrial Production (M/M), Construction Output (M/M)
14.00 UTC 12-Jun Preliminary University of Michigan Sentiment Index

Hong Kong dents optimism but stocks remain on track

Morning Note

US shares surged on Tuesday, with the Dow rising more than 2%, briefly trading above the 25k level again before closing a little short. The S&P 500 rose over 1%, traded above 3,000 for the first time since March 5th hitting a high at 3,021 before it too closed below this psychologically important level. The broad index traded above the important 200-day moving average but failed to close above this indicator.

Economies continue to reopen a little quicker than we’d feared. US airlines are reporting a uptick in passenger levels vs where they were last month, but were down about 80% from the same Memorial holiday weekend a year before. Globally, it seems as though countries are able to ease lockdown restrictions without sparking immediate secondary waves of infections – albeit the risk of such emerging down the line should not be ignored.

The higher the S&P 500 rises without earnings picking up the pricier it gets. PE multiples already look stretched and further gains for the index would come despite declining earnings, stretching these valuations still further. What happens when banks really lay bare all the non-performing loans they are going to need to write off?

US stock markets test key 200-day SMA

In the last two major recessions (see below chart), the 200-day simple moving average has been the ceiling for the market. A breakout here would be important for recovering market highs – failure could suggest it will contain price action for a while. I hate to say it but this time could be different – central bank largesse was not a factor like it is today. This only concentrates the power of the largest capitalised companies.

What’s going on in the real economy is not reflected by markets. Even as we reopen, the economic uncertainty and long-term health fears will support household deleveraging, boost savings rates and knock consumer spending.

Today the Fed will release its Beige Book providing anecdotal evidence of business activity across the US – there will be some very grim stories to tell and will underline how it will take a long time to get businesses and people moving at the same rate they were before the crisis.

Tensions in Hong Kong weigh on global equities – will the US sanction China?

The rally in global equities seen at the start of the week ran out of steam a little in Asia overnight though as tensions in Hong Kong hove into view once more. Riot police fired pepper pellets at groups gathering to protest a bill that would ban people from insulting the Chinese national anthem. This comes as tensions were stoked by China’s planned introduction of sweeping national security powers in Hong Kong.

There is a strong chance that the anti-Beijing feeling grows and leads to the kind of unrest we saw over several months last year. The US is said to be considering sanctions against China; Beijing said yesterday it was increasing its readiness for military combat. Whilst the eyes of the world are on Hong Kong, China is already engaged in a military standoff on its border with India.

Asia soft, European stocks firm

Asian shares fell broadly, although Tokyo held up as Japan said it will carry out another $1.1 trillion stimulus package on top of a $1.1tn programme already launched last month. The Hang Seng dipped by almost 1%. But European shares rose with the FTSE 100 recapturing 6100 and making a sally towards 6200 and to close the early March gap.

Yesterday the DAX made the move back towards its Mach 6th close at 11,541 to fill the gap but failed to complete the move on the close. This morning the DAX moved strongly through this level after a pause at the open, moving back to 11,600.

Euro, pound come off highs, retreat from key technical levels

In FX, both the euro and pound failed to really make any real breach despite a strong gain yesterday and have come off their highs. EURUSD moved back towards the middle of the recent range, having fallen short of a move back to 1.10 and was last trading around 1.0960.  GBPUSD has retreated under 1.23 having fallen short of the 50% retracement of the move lower over the last month around 1.2375.

After Germany and France proposed a €500bn bailout fund based on mutual debt issuance (what some have dubbed Europe’s Hamiltonian moment), EC President Ursula von der Leyen will present her plans, which will build on the Franco-German proposal and call for a €1 trillion plan. If the budget talks are successful it should lower the risk premium on EU sovereign debt, lowering bond yields and offering succour to the euro as well as to European equity markets. It would also mark a major step towards EU fiscal policy coordination and possible fiscal union. The frugal four remain a hindrance but Merkel’s weight is behind this.

We’re also looking at the appearance before MPs today by Michael Gove and UK Brexit negotiator David Frost.

Gold falls to test $1700, WTI crude oil edges down to $34

Gold was weaker, testing $1700 again as US yields rallied on economic reopening, but 10yr Treasury yields peeled back off the highs at 0.7% due perhaps to the US-China tension.

WTI (Aug) has retreated further from the $35 level and is testing support around $34. The pattern suggests a pause for thought as we try to figure out the mess of supply and demand. The pattern is one of consolidation with a bullish flag forming, with better demand forming the basis for the move alongside supply impairment that was evidenced by a new report from the IEA saying Covid-19 will cause investment in the energy sector to decline by $400bn this year. That is the kind of capex carnage that will remove a lot of supply and force rebalance quickly.

Chart: The 200-day line has been a ceiling in past recessions

Week Ahead: Covid-19 to hit sentiment, can discounters thrive?

Week Ahead

A raft of sentiment data, US goods orders figures, and earnings from discounters well-positioned to thrive during the current economic downturn will be the focus of financial markets in the week ahead. Here’s your full break-down of the top events to watch. 

German confidence heading higher? UK, NZ sentiment predicted to drop further 

There is plenty of sentiment data available this week, with the German Ifo Business Climate, GfK Consumer Sentiment surveys for Germany and the UK, the US CB Consumer Confidence report, and the latest ANZ Business Confidence survey for New Zealand in the docket. 

The mood is expected to have improved in Germany, where lockdowns were lighter to begin with and so the expected economic hit shouldn’t be so severe. Schools and small businesses have reopened, and the return to some kind of normality is expected to lift sentiment from its historic lows. 

It will be a different story in the UK, where the bulk of restrictions remain in place. A sharp rise in unemployment will also weigh on sentiment, with even workers shielded by the governments furlough scheme left uncertain about their future once the Treasury stops paying their wages. 

Meanwhile, although the New Zealand economy has reopened, the latest ANZ confidence survey is expected to show another weakening in business sentiment 

This may not truly reflect the current mood, however, as the government last week announced fiscal stimulus equal to over 20% of GDP to jump-start growth, and predicted a return to pre-Covid-19 levels of joblessness within two years. 

Flash CPI: Germany and Eurozone 

The collapse in oil prices and the continued stimulus efforts of the European Central Bank will weigh on the latest inflation figures from Germany and the Eurozone this week. 

Price growth in the Eurozone slumped from 0.7% to a four-year low of 0.3% in April, finalised data last week confirmed. The collapse in crude oil prices was largely to blame; the more stable core reading slipped to 0.9% from 1% year-on-year. Food, alcohol, and tobacco prices rose. 

While many of the Eurozone’s major economies slipped into deflation, price growth remained firmer in Germany. Another bout of data like that this week could fuel further tensions between the Eurozone’s powerhouse and its central bank, who were arguing over the legality of its asset purchasing programme. 

US durable goods orders to collapse further, unemployment to hit spending 

US durable goods orders tumbled in March. Orders plunged 14.4% on the month, with a collapse in transport orders, particularly commercial aircraft, largely responsible. 

Forecasts for April suggest a further 25% decline. Personal income and spending figures later in the week could also show another large drop. Income declined -2% on the month during March, while spending dropped a record 7.5% as people complied with stay-at-home orders. With 20 million Americans losing their jobs in April, the next set of income figures is likely to show a larger collapse. 

Japan unemployment rate, flash industrial production, retail sales 

A slew of data from Japan on Friday will give a broad view of how the economy is faring, although we already know it’s in a recession. Unemployment is expected to have climbed to 3.2% during April, from 2.5% in March. Retail is expected to continue to shrink on the month, with the rate of decline slowing from 4.5% to 3.2%. Preliminary industrial production data will show whether the 5.2% year-on-year decline recorded in March moderated last month. 

Earnings: Discounters expected to fare well on consumer stockpiling 

Discounters Costco, Dollar General, and Dollar Tree all report earnings this week. Consumers rushed to buy the essentials during Q1 and tightening budgets and surging jobless rates could help drive demand in the long run. 

Costco, however, has other business interests that may continue to feel the pain of the stalling economy and social-distancing measures; stagnation in its food courts, travel services, and optical services wings dragged comparable sales down 4.7% on the year in April, even as demand for consumer staples surged. 

Dollar Tree announced that it would bring on an additional 25,000 staff to help it cope with the increased demand in its stores and distribution centres. Earnings will take knock from the decision to suspend online sales for seven days towards the end of March, which hit revenue by almost 20% during the period. Online is where other retailers like Walmart have been able to make up for falling instore sales volumes. 

Dollar General is the clear winner in terms of stock performance, having gained 16% since the start of the year. Costco is nearly 5% higher, while Dollar Tree, which performed well during the last recession, has slumped nearly 15%. Goldman Sachs initiated the stock as a “Buy” last week.

Heads-Up on Earnings 

The following companies are set to publish their quarterly earnings reports this week:

Pre-Market 27-May Royal Bank of Canada
After-Market 27-May Autodesk – Q1 2021
After-Market 27-May Workday Inc – Q1 2021
Pre-Market 28-May Dollar Tree – Q1 2020
14.00 UTC 28-May Dollar General – Q1 2020
After-Market 28-May Salesforce – Q1 2021
After-Market 28-May Costco Wholesale Corp – Q3 2020
After-Market 28-May Dell Technologies – Q1 2021

 

Highlights on XRay this Week 

17.00 UTC 25-May Blonde Markets
15.30 UTC 26-May Weekly Gold Forecast
10.00 UTC 27-May The Marketsx Experience: Platform Walkthrough
14.45 UTC 28-May Master the Markets with Andrew Barnett
12.25 UTC  29-May US PCE: Live Market Analysis

 

Key Economic Events

Watch out for the biggest events on the economic calendar this week:

08.00 UTC 25-May German Ifo Business Climate
06.00 UTC 26-May German GfK Consumer Climate
14.00 UTC 26-May US CB Consumer Confidence
01.30 UTC 27-May Australia Construction Work Done (Q1)
01.00 UTC 28-May New Zealand ANZ Business Confidence
01.30 UTC 28-May AU Private Capital Expenditure (QoQ)
12.00 UTC 28-May Germany Preliminary CPI
12.30 UTC 28-May US Durable Goods Orders
14.30 UTC 28-May US EIA Natural Gas Storage
15.00 UTC 28-May US EIA Crude Oil Inventories
23.01 UTC 28-May UK GfK Consumer Confidence
23.30 UTC 28-May Japan Unemployment Rate, Flash Industrial Production, Retail Sales
09.00 UTC 29-May Eurozone Flash Inflation
12.30 UTC 29-May Canada GDP (Q1)
12.30 UTC 29-May US PCE, Personal Income, Personal Spending

Week Ahead: UK and Eurozone GDP, NZ Budget, Marriott earnings

Week Ahead

Economic data at the moment tends to fall into one of two categories: 1) How bad did things get in Q1, and, 2) How quickly are they likely to get better? Everyone knows the Q2 data is where the real pain lies, but markets want an idea of where things stood before the effects of COVID-19 lockdowns really began to bite. 

To this end flash Q1 GDP figures from the UK, Germany, and the Eurozone this week will act as a primer ahead of data for the current quarter. The US has already reported its advanced GDP estimate for Q1, showing that the economy contracted 4.8% during the first three months of the year, compared to expectations of 4%. 

The UK economy is expected to shrink 4.4% on the previous quarter, the German economy by 2.8%, and the Eurozone by 3.8%. If the US data is any indication, these forecasts may not be bleak enough. 

The key question, though, is whether this weakness is the predicted impact of COVID-19 arriving earlier than expected, or a sign that the impact is worse than the already dire expectations. 

The US will post inflation and retail sales data, and the University of Michigan will publish its preliminary reading of its latest sentiment index. Australian releases this week include the wage price index and employment change and unemployment rate figures. 

China industry, retail sales and New Zealand Budget 

On the other end of the scale, Chinese industrial production and retail sales figures for April will give markets a vague idea of what an economy on the other side of lockdown looks like. It’s not an entirely accurate bellwether – China returned to work around the same time that Europe battened down the hatches. 

The shuttering of businesses across the West will damage manufacturing demand in Asia. Industrial production is expected to drop 4.2%, compared to 1.1% drop in March. Retail sales had cratered nearly 16% in February. The unemployment rate is expected to tick higher to 6.3% from 5.9%. 

Also on the postCOVID front, the New Zealand government will hand down its latest Budget release this week. Finance Minister Grant Robertson has already laid out his strategy in a prebudget speech (delivered via video link, of course): respond, recovery, rebuild. 

Particularly interesting is that Robertson says this will be a chance to not just rebuild the economy, but rebuild it better. Will other finance ministers around the globe be looking to reshape their economies over the coming months and years, or simply get the train back on the rails? The notion could drastically change what markets should expect from the coming years. 

Earning season: Marriott, Cisco, Tencent 

Marriott earnings are due before the market opens on the 11thThe hotel giant recently raised $920 million in new cash through its credit card partners. Revenue per available room was down 60% during March. 

The stock has a “Hold” consensus with a 19% upside (based on the May 6th closing price) according to our Analyst Recommendations tool. Hedge funds has sold shares in the previous quarter, while insiders have snapped up the stock. The latest research on the stock from Thompson Reuters is available to download in the Marketsx platform.

Marketsx stock sentiment tools: Marriott International Inc (MAR – NASDAQ)

Cisco reports after the market close on May 13th. While analysts rate the stock a “Buy”, hedge funds dumped 83 million shares in the last quarter, with company insiders selling over 9 million in the last three months. The latest research on the stock from Thompson Reuters is available to download in the Marketsx platform.

Marketsx stock sentiment tools: Cisco Systems Inc (CSCO – NASDAQ)

Tencent Holdings, Sony, and Wirecard also report this week.

 

Heads-Up on Earnings 

The following companies are set to publish their quarterly earnings reports this week: 

Pre-Market 11-May Marriott – Q1 2020
11-May Bridgestone Corp – Q1 2020
05.00 UTC 12-May Allianz – Q1 2020
12-May Vodafone Group – Q4 2020
Pre-Market 13-May Tencent Holdings – Q1 2020
After-Market 13-May Cisco – Q3 2020
13-May Sony Corp – FY 2019/20
14-May Wirecard – Q1 2020
14-May Astellas Pharma – Q4 2019

Highlights on XRay this Week 

07.15 UTC   Daily      European Morning Call 
09.00 UTC   Daily   Earnings Season Daily Special 
 15.30 UTC 12-May   Weekly Gold Forecast
12.50 UTC 13-May Indices Insights
18.00 UTC  14-May BlondeMoney Gamma Special

Key Economic Events 

Watch out for the biggest events on the economic calendar this week: 

23.50 UTC 10-May Bank of Japan Summary of Opinions
01.30 UTC 12-May China CPI
07.00 UTC 12-May UK Preliminary Quarterly GDP
12.30 UTC 12-May US CPI
01.30 UTC 13-May Australia Wage Price Index (Q/Q)
03.00 UTC 13-May RBNZ Interest Rate Decision
14.30 UTC 13-May US EIA Crude Oil Inventories
01.30 UTC 14-May Australia Employment Change / Unemployment Rate
02.00 UTC 14-May New Zealand Annual Budget Release
12.30 UTC 14-May US Jobless Claims
14.30 UTC 14-May US EIA Natural Gas Storage
02.00 UTC 15-May China Industrial Production / Retail Sales
06.00 UTC 15-May Germany Preliminary GDP (Q1)
09.00 UTC 15-May Eurozone Preliminary GDP and Employment Change (Q1)
12.30 UTC 15-May US Retail Sales
14.00 UTC 15-May Preliminary University of Michigan Sentiment Index

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